The Essential Guide: Where to Eat Tapas in Granada

Any visitor to Spain will likely be familiar with the concept of tapas. These light bites served alongside a round of drinks are a staple in the Spanish way of life.

The origin of the term, though, is uncertain, with countless stories as to how and when the practice came about.

One such tale has it that under the monarchy of Fernando el Católico, it became obligatory for bar owners to serve food with alcohol as a response to an increasingly drunken workforce. As a result, patrons can now order a drink and be provided with a plate of something tasty. Though the practice may be fading in certain parts of the country, any visitor looking to eat tapas in Granada will quickly discover the tradition is still alive and kicking.

If you’re hungry after a day of sightseeing, the following bars all have a huge choice of dishes! So, let’s look over some of the top spots to eat tapas in Granada.

Enjoy a timeless Spanish culinary tradition, granadino style! We've got you covered with the best picks for tapas in Granada.

Bar los Diamantes

Opened in 1942 and still going strong, this is a number one spot with the locals. If you’re looking for a taste of traditional granadino hospitality there really is nowhere better. This neighborhood bar has remained largely unchanged since the middle of the century. Specialists in seafood, it’s the staples of bacalao (salt cod) and calamari rings that have kept the locals coming back time and again for 75 years.

Address: Calle Navas, 28 (and four other locations in the city)

One of the best tapas in Granada is the calamari at Bar Los Diamantes.
The fried fish at Los Diamantes is legendary

Sibarius

Worlds away from the rough-and-ready charm of the Diamantes, this plush, trendy establishment serves a fusion of Spanish, Peruvian and Asian cuisine in contemporary surroundings. Their wine selection is splendid. Hungry? Then take a look at the extensive menu which blends influences from across three continentsthe house specialty of huevos rotos (fried eggs broken over other ingredients), foie and goby fish is a true taste sensation.

Address: Plaza Bib Rambla, 20

Huevos rotos are one of the house specialties at Sibarius and one of the best tapas in Granada.
There are many different varieties of huevos rotos. How many have you tried?

Al Sur de Granada

It’s no secret that you’re spoilt for choice when it comes to tapas in Granada. Walking its streets can be overwhelming as they abound with similar bars and rival proprietors. In a quieter part of town, this delicatessen stands out as one of the city’s culinary gems. The beer-barrel tables serve as a relaxed space to sit and savor a selection of organic Spanish cheese and charcuterie. What’s more, being a deli means you can buy as much as you’d like to take home with youas long as it will fit in your luggage!

Address: Calle Elvira, 150

We love family-run delicatessens in Granada! To visit another one of our favorites, join us on our Hidden Granada Food & Tapas Adventure where you’ll taste the best local cheese and jamón.

Some of the best tapas in Granada are as simple as perfectly cured ham and cheese.
We can’t get enough of the delicious, high-quality deli products in Spain!

Bodegas Espadafor

Perhaps one of Granada’s most renowned establishments, this bar can still afford to close on Sundays and weekday afternoons, so careful not to get caught out there! Founded in 1910, it has maintained its traditional decor. Photos of celebrated bullfighters and flamenco stars line the walls. There are few better locations in the city to enjoy Spanish cuisine as it’s been served for hundreds of years: drenched in olive oil and accompanied by mountains of crusty bread. Good hearty stews and sublime ham dominate the menu here. While a decent bite is served with every drink, ordering the local specialty, habas con jamón (stewed broad beans with Spanish ham), is an absolute must.

Address: Gran Vía de Colón, 59

Bar Poë

In culinary terms, this bar is certainly the most unconventional on the list, and for good reason. Owned by Matt (“as English as baked beans on toast” according to their website) and his Angolan wife, Ana, their tapas have been causing quite a stir in the city in recent years. A blend of flavors largely inspired by Ana’s African roots give a spicy kick to the great Spanish tradition. For tapas in Granada with an international edge, look no further.   

Address: Calle Verónica de la Magdalena, 40

This selection is just the start of a limitless choice of bars for eating tapas in Granada, the place many consider the tapas capital of Spain. Why not join us on our Hidden Granada Food & Tapas Adventure to delve deeper into this exciting social and culinary scene.

Leave a Reply